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Reworking English in Rhetoric and Composition

Reworking English in Rhetoric and Composition

Global Interrogations, Local Interventions

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Edited by Bruce Horner and Karen Kopelson

$40.00

E-book (Other formats: Paperback)
978-0-8093-3339-4

07/25/2014

 

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About the Book

In Reworking English in Rhetoric and Composition, editors Bruce Horner and Karen Kopelson gather leading scholars and new voices in the field of rhetoric and composition to offer a dynamic new perspective on English as it is used today. This provocative volume explores the myriad ways in which English is constantly redefined, revised, and redirected through specific, located acts of writing, rhetoric, teaching, and learning. Contributors provide insightful contributions to the study of English from both national and international perspectives, revealing the language as a fluid and constantly changing manner of expression that challenges established notions.

In part one, “Reworking Language,” writers call into question the idea of language as a static, stable entity. In part two, “Locations and Migrations: Global/Local Interrogations,” contributors explore the impact of writing and teaching English in both in the United States and abroad, from Arkansas and Oklahoma to China, Jamaica, and Lebanon. Part three, “Pedagogical/Institutional Interventions,” addresses English in institutional settings and the implications for future pedagogical work. Each essay in this revolutionary volume substantiates two key premises for the rethinking of English: first, that languages are susceptible to constant change through the very acts of writing, teaching, and learning, and second, that this reworking occurs as it moves between various temporal and spatial locations.

Throughout the volume, the variety and flexibility of English across the globe are both advocated and revealed, rejecting dominant Anglophone perspectives and instead placing language in cross-cultural contexts. Brimming with informative and thought-provoking insights, Reworking English in Rhetoric and Composition breathes new life into the field and provides direction for scholars and teachers looking to the future of English.

Authors/Editors

Bruce Horner holds the Endowed Chair in Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Louisville. He is the author or editor of a number of widely cited books, including Terms of Work for Composition: A Materialist Critique and, withMin-Zhan Lu and Paul Kei Matsuda, Cross-Language Relations in Composition, winner of the 2012 CCCC outstanding book award.

Karen Kopelson is an associate professor of English, University Distinguished Teaching Professor, and the director of graduate studies in English at the University of Louisville. She is the award-winning author of a number of articles exploring the performance or discursive constitution of identities and difference.

Reviews

“Taking multilingualism and the plurality of Englishes as the global norm, Horner and Kopelson assemble a cast of leading scholars in rhetoric and composition who persuasively challenge us to rework our traditional and monolingualist paradigms, practice in light of this new norm, and interrogate its local and global manifestations. This is a refreshingly provocative collection of essays that will catapult translingual practice to new heights.”—Shondel Nero, associate professor, New York University

Reworking English in Rhetoric and Composition is a timely addition to the thickening conversation in the field about the place of English in the first-year writing classroom. Astutely theoretical and pragmatic, this collection explores our growing recognition that difference rather than sameness is the new normal. A must-read for anyone ready to embrace a new orientation that directly addresses the repertoire of motives and dispositions students bring with them to the twenty-first-century writing classroom.”—Juan C. Guerra, associate professor and director of graduate programs, University of Washington