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Origins and Development of Medical Imaging

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T. Doby and G. Alker

$20.99

E-book
978-0-8093-8125-8

04/27/1997

Medical Humanites

 

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About the Book

In this newest volume in the Medical Humanities Series, T. Doby and G. Alker trace the development of our ability to visualize the inside of the human body.

For thousands of years, horror of the dead, superstition, and oppressive decrees prevented our ancestors from looking inside the human body; in ancient civilizations, diagnostics were based on imagination and theory, with only limited observation. So people developed suppositions about health and disease without knowing how the liver, heart, brain, and blood vessels looked or functioned. In tracing the history of medical imaging, Doby and Alker establish that it was not until the Renaissance and the detailed drawings of human anatomy by da Vinci and Vesalius that successful internal imaging of the human body was born.

At the turn of the nineteenth century, Roentgenā€™s discovery of the X-ray provided the first miraculous look into the living body. From that instant, medical imaging developed at an ever-increasing pace, evolving to more recent discoveries in nuclear medicine, CT scanning, and ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging.

As Doby and Alker note, we can expect our efforts to be understood in the future only if we examine past events with an appreciation of the difficulties and challenges that faced our predecessors. Despite almost unbelievable advances in current medical technology, we must still rely on our own resources and common sense as human beings in understanding what technology can and cannot do for us.

A comprehensive set of appendixes pictorially depicting the history of imaging round out the volume.

Authors/Editors

T. Doby, M.D., F.A.C.R., and member of the New York Academy of Science, is the author of Discoverers of Blood Circulation and Development of Angioraphy.

G. Alker, M.D., was a professor and chair of the Department of Radiology at the StateUniversity of New York at Buffalo. He was associate editor of the leading specialty journal Computerized Radiology.